Category: Uncategorized

Sorting Through The Misconceptions of Reconditioned Products

A lot of misconceptions surround products labeled as reconditioned, refurbished, and as-is.  Reconditioned products are products that have been returned to the manufacturer or a third-party company to thoroughly be checked, taken apart, repaired, put back together, tested, and sold.  They are unable to be sold as new without going through the refurbishing process, even if they are in mint condition.  Many electronics, large scaled manufacturing equipment, appliances, and electrical goods are sold in this manner. 

Purpose of Factory Reconditioning

There are a number of reasons that product reconditioning exists. One reason, consumers will return items that are defective or may have become damaged.  Sometimes however there is nothing wrong with the item but once it has been purchased and returned, electric items and manufacturing components can’t be sold as new.  Other times equipment and components are becoming obsolete and the only way to have replacement parts for repair is for manufacturers to refurbish components and manufacturing equipment.  This is common in transformers, panel switches, and bus ducts & plugs.

The Reconditioning Process

Each product reconditioning specialist has their own set of standards that refurbished products and components need to go through before being resold.  Some reconditioned products are sold “as new” which means that they have run through a series of checks and balances to ensure all the issues, cosmetic and functional, are fixed. Other companies disassemble, inspect, repair, reassemble, tests, and then and only then is a product fit for resale.  This is often the case in manufacturing and larger scaled equipment like transformers, disconnect, and such. 

Advantages with Reconditioning

Obviously, reconditioning comes with cost savings over buying new. Manufacturers can’t charge the new prices for products that are refurbished.  Prices will vary on reconditioned components based on the supplier and of course the product.  As do new products, most refurbished products offer a warranty.  It is important to research the warranty and return policy of any reconditioned/refurbished product you purchase.

Difference between Factory Reconditioning and Third-Party Refurbishment

Most often when a product is labeled as “factory reconditioned” it means that it has been refurbished by either the manufacturer or a third-party that is certified.  When you purchase a reconditioned part or equipment you should expect that it has been tested and repaired to meet all of the original standards of a new product.

J & P Electrical Company is a full-service electrical company that supplies contractors, end users, and supply houses with new surplus, quality reconditioned, and obsolete electrical equipment. We purchase a wide range of electrical equipment such as bus plugs, bud ducts, panel switches, substations, and transformers.  More information can be found at https://www.jpelectricalcompany.com



Leviton’s new smart Load Center brings app control to your circuit breakers

Leviton has announced a new version of its Load Center breaker box for homes, and it’s adding an integrated Wi-Fi or Ethernet hub that will let you manage your home electrical setup directly from your phone. That’s right: smart circuit breakers are here. Smart circuit breakers are here

There have been after-market products that can monitor energy use in your home before, like Sense, but Leviton’s system goes a step further by integrating smart technology directly into the breaker box and individual circuit breakers, giving homeowners far more information on the power management in their homes.

The smart Load Center works with Leviton’s existing MyLeviton app for Android and iOS, and it gives ridiculously granular data on energy use in your home, letting homeowners track power consumption on a per-appliance or branch circuit basis, get alerts when circuit breakers trip and why they did, or even remotely shut off a circuit breaker from the app. In addition to the Load Center, Leviton will also offer smart circuit breakers to go with it, which will use the integrated hub to stay updated with the latest firmware. (It’s a mildly concerning phrase to see in the same context as “circuit breakers that control your home electricity.”)

There’s no support for Google Assistant, Alexa, or Apple HomeKit yet, likely due to the fact that none of the major smart home services are designed to handle anything this complex. Also, Leviton’s smart breaker box is essentially the first to be announced, but it’s possible that deeper support could be coming in the future.

There’s no word on price or release date, but it’s probable that this will be limited to professional electricians and developers to buy and install in houses they’re building, considering the sheer complexity of installing something like this. (It’s not the sort of hardware that you’ll use on your own for a weekend project.)

If you are building a home from scratch, however, it’s a pretty cool idea. Just remember to label all your circuit breaker switches right the first time around.

Original Source: https://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2019/2/19/18231753/leviton-smart-load-center-app-control-circuit-breakers-ios-android

Original Date: Feb 19 2019

Written By: Chaim Gartenberg

Benefits of Installing Refurbished Equipment

In a manufacturing facility there are many different pieces of equipment working in conjunction with one another to ensure the process runs smoothly.  When one of the pieces breaks down and needs to be repaired or replaced time is of the essence in keeping downtime to a minimal.  The goal for most facilities is to repair equipment as purchasing new equipment is timely, availability is often scarce, and it is not always cost effective.  When large scaled manufacturing equipment cannot be repaired, and new equipment is not readily available the next logical step is to consider refurbished equipment

Why Refurbished May Be Best Option

Refurbished equipment is often considered better than brand new equipment for a number of reasons.  First, older equipment that has gone through the refurbishment process are sure to have the “new equipment” bugs worked out.  Equipment that has been refurbished is beneficial because it often costs less.  The equipment you can purchase refurbished is often of a higher quality than would be purchased new at the same cost.  Lastly, each piece of refurbished electrical equipment goes through a strict testing process.  It is almost guaranteed you will not experience downtime due to equipment failure soon after refurbished components are installed at your facility. 

The Refurbishing Process

During the refurbishing process equipment is completely disassembled.  Parts within the piece are inspected and if needed replaced with new or refurbished electrical components to ensure the safety of each piece.  Once the components are all tested and put back together equipment must go through and pass rigorous testing.  The reconditioning process consists of disassembling, testing, cleaning, inspecting, replacing or repairing the piece from the inside out. 

Refurbished equipment is readily available.  It is possible to find the same system you have been working with for years refurbished which makes replacement as simple as disconnecting malfunctioning equipment and replacing it with the refurbished unit.  Often when installing new equipment there will need to be some reconfiguration of systems already in place to make room the layout of the new equipment. 

Refurbished Parts Are Readily Available

Another major benefit of installing refurbished equipment is the availability of components if something does break down.  New equipment is often harder to access parts for as they are new to the market and manufacturers are not prepared for the need for parts for repair.  Many suppliers of reconditioned equipment also have warehouses of new, obsolete, and refurbished components that are readily available if a repair is needed.  Again, improving downtime due to equipment failure.

There are many myths out there surrounding the purchase and use of refurbished equipment and components in equipment repair.  It is important to do research before purchasing any equipment from suppliers that you are unfamiliar with.  Developing a relationship with a supplier of new, refurbished, & obsolete components and equipment helps prevent downtime in production.  Companies like J and P also offer services including asset recovery, plant clean out, and refurbishing which is beneficial in the removal of equipment should the need arise.

J & P Electrical Company is a full-service electrical company that supplies contractors, end users, and supply houses with new surplus, quality reconditioned, and obsolete electrical equipment. We purchase a wide range of electrical equipment such as bus plugs, bud ducts, panel switches, substations, and transformers.  More information can be found at https://www.jpelectricalcompany.com



How Will We Know if We Should Replace or Recondition Large Scaled Electrical Equipment?


Transformers are used in industrial and manufacturing settings as a way to control the electricity infrastructure within a facility.  They are used to step up and power down different voltages of electricity to equipment throughout.  The longevity of transformers comes down the environment in which they are ran and the amount of usage received.  A typical end of life period for transformers under average usage is somewhere between twenty to forty years.  Factors other than age are often used to consider if a transformer should be replaced.  With this in mind, many facilities are considering refurbishing older transformers that are still showing signs of good health instead of replacement. 

In the following installment we will look at the many reasons that refurbishment of transformers is becoming popular verse replacement.  We will also look at why some transformers can be refurbished and why others shouldn’t be.  There are limitations to refurbishing transformers that we will look into as well. 

Why Choose to Refurbish Verse Replace?

Refurbishing Transformers Saves Money and Time

The cost to refurbish a transformer is substantially less than purchasing a brand new one.  Cost is definitely a factor in refurbishing, but it is also important to recognize the time saving.  The time to refurbish a transformer is substantially less than the time it takes to procure a new piece of electrical equipment for your facility, such as a transformer.

Buying new equipment often comes about through a lengthy process that requires approval from a number of sources before it can be completed.  It is also considered a capital expense which many facilities try to budget ahead for.  Refurbishment is often classified as a revenue expense which doesn’t often require approval.  Extending the life of quality assets is good for business and refurbishing can achieve this without risk. 

Extended Transformer Life

We are all responsible for doing our part in creating a sustainable environment to leave to generations to come.  The environmental impact of manufacturing and equipment disposal is not something that is taken lightly.  Reconditioning transformers and other large scaled equipment helps to demonstrate environmental sustainability which is not only showing corporate responsibility but also regulatory consciousness.  Prolonging the life of large scaled equipment through reconditioning is just one way to exhibit your company’s commitment to environmental impact as well as to the confidence that the plant will continue to operate efficiently without risk of unexpected failure.

If you do find that you have had to replace a transformer for a reason other than failure, the older transformer can be refurbished and kept as a spare.  In order to determine if a transformer can be refurbished it is necessary to assess the transformer.  The extent of reconditioning needed to make it like new again may be deemed too much.  However, when refurbishment is deemed appropriate, the transformer is brought to a dedicated facility where reconditioning can be performed. 

J & P Electrical Company is a full-service electrical company that supplies contractors, end users, and supply houses with new surplus, quality reconditioned, and obsolete electrical equipment. We purchase a wide range of electrical equipment such as bus plugs, bud ducts, panel switches, substations, and transformers.  More information can be found at https://www.jpelectricalcompany.com



Seasonal power demands overload circuits

(Norma Vally) Seasonal demands on power, such as the addition of space heaters, can overload electrical circuits.

(Norma Vally) Seasonal demands on power, such as the addition of space heaters, can overload electrical circuits. By Norma Vally Home Matters January 30, 2019 – 4:09 pm  

Lower temperatures this time of year have increased people’s use of space heaters. These units, while small in size, pull more energy than expected, especially in older homes. Without an upgraded electric service, circuits overload and breakers trip when this type of appliance is added to a line while other devices are in use.

Overloading a circuit comes with risks. According to the National Ag Safety Database: “Overloaded outlets and circuits carry too much electricity, which generates heat in undetectable amounts. The heat causes wear on the internal wiring system and can ignite a fire.”

To be clear, when I say “overload” I mean a response to a circuit when many things are plugged in and running at the same time. A response can range from dimming lights to actually tripping the breaker. A breaker is designed to trip “off” when the power load (measured in watts) exceeds the amount of amps a single circuit breaker can handle.

Most circuit breakers in your service are 15 amp. Conservatively, on a 15 amp breaker you can use 80 percent of its amperage all at once, which is 12 amps. This means no matter which outlet you’re using on a particular circuit, or how many things you have plugged into it, the total load should not exceed 12 amps or you risk tripping the breaker.

The question becomes, how is someone supposed to know how many amps are being pulled based on watt usage? There’s a formula — watts/volts=amps — and once you know what numbers to plug in (pun intended), it’s easy to calculate.

Becoming acquainted with basic electric lingo will be helpful as well. Know that watts is a unit to measure “power.” Volts is the pressure by which electrons are being “pushed.” Amps is a base unit of electrical “current.”

FYI, in the U.S. our lines are 120 volt, unless doubled for larger appliances, becoming 240-volt circuits.

You should also know what switches and receptacles are on what breakers. Breaker box mapping can be disheartening in older homes where you’ll discover several rooms, including a bathroom, are all on one 15-amp breaker — hence the bedroom lights dimming when someone uses a hair dryer in the bathroom.

Here’s a practical example: If you’re using a 1200-watt microwave on a 120-volt line, it will pull 10 amps (1200w/120v=10amps), leaving you with only 2 amps on that circuit (remember, max usage on a 15-amp breaker is 12 amps). So let’s say while you’re heating up a plate of leftovers, on the same circuit, someone starts up a 1500-watt space heater … pop, that breaker will trip (1500w/120v=12.5amp, plus the 10 amps from the microwave, a total of 22.5 amps) well exceeding the 15-amp breaker.

Receptacles that serviced homes built several decades ago fall short given today’s demands from electronics, appliances, etc. One outlet in a medium-sized room sufficed back in the ’30s and ’40s. Today, the standard electrical code is one receptacle every 6 feet. While an older home may only have a 100-amp service, today the same size home will have 200-amp service or more.

The truth is it doesn’t matter if you have two or 200 outlets on one circuit (to exaggerate a point); it will only overload if you’re using more amps than what that particular circuit breaker is designed to handle. When we add a space heater or any device that pulls hundreds of watts at once, we should always assess what other devices are on the same circuit that may run simultaneously.

Splitting up the number of outlets being used to multiple breakers will solve an overloading problem. I make this statement provided there are no age-related issues in your wiring, such as worn-out insulation. At any rate, adding breakers to your service is definitely a job for a licensed electrician.

A good electrician will first determine the condition of your wiring, if you can add breakers to your existing service and if your service panel needs upgrading (and what permits may be required), and give you an estimate of how much the project will cost.

Original Source: https://bouldercityreview.com/community/seasonal-power-demands-overload-circuits-50475/

Written By: Norma Vally Home Matters

Published Date: Jan 30 2019